Science Syllabi

Biology | | Chemistry | | Engineering | | General Science | | Geology | | Geography | | Mathematics | | Pre-medical Sciences | | Physics |

BIOLOGY [top]

BIOL 110 - Biology and Society [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 112 - Human Body Structures and Functions [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 121 - Introductory Biology I [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 122 - Introductory Biology II [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 223 - Vertebrate Zoology [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 224 - Microbiology [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 230 - Environmental Conservation [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 240 - Ecology [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 250 - Systematic Botany [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 252 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 255 - Introduction to Genetics [PDF] [DOC]
BIOL 258 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II [PDF] [DOC]

Chemistry [top]

CHEM 110 - Introduction To Chemistry
CHEM 111 - General Chemsitry I
CHEM 112 - General Chemistry II
CHEM 210 - Organic Chemistry Survey
CHEM 251 - Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 252 - Organic Chemsitry II
CHEM 281 - Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 299 - Special Topics

ENGINEERING [top]

ENGR 111 - Introduction to Engineering [PDF] [DOC]
CE 233 - Engineering Statics [PDF] [DOC]
EE 201 - Engineering Circuit Analysis [PDF] [DOC]
ME 159 - Graphical Communication and Design [PDF] [DOC]
ME 234 - Engineering Dynamics [PDF] [DOC]
ME 240 - Engineering Thermodynamics [PDF] [DOC]

General Science [top]

San Juan College offers an Associate of Science Degree with concentration in general science. Those students interested in taking courses for possible degrees in a science field should follow the general course outline described below.

Approved electives as indicated below:
Biology: Any biology course
Chemistry: Any chemistry course except CHEM 110
Computer Science: Any COSC course except COSC 111, COSC 116, COSC 125, COSC 135, and COSC 185
Engineering: Any CE, EE, ENGR, ET, or ME course
Geology: any geology course
Mathematics: MATH 189, MATH 231, or MATH 268
Physics: Any physics course except PHYS 111

Mathematics [top]

Click here to view the Syllabi for the Department of Mathematics.

GEOLOGY [top]

GEOL 110 - Introduction to Geology [PDF] [DOC]
GEOL 111 - Historical Geology Syllabus [PDF] [DOC]
GEOL 270 - Mineralogy [PDF] [DOC]
GEOL 271 - Petrology [PDF] [DOC]

GEOGRAPHY [top]

GEOG 145 - Introduction to Human Geography [PDF] [DOC]
GEOG 155 - Introduction to Physical Geography [PDF] [DOC]

Pre-Medical Sciences [top]

Students planning to apply to a post-baccalaureate education program should major in biology, chemistry, or general science with preponderance of courses in biology and chemistry.

Physics [top]

PHYS 111 - Introduction to Physics
PHYS 211 - General Physics I
PHYS 212 - General Physics II
PHYS 215 - Engineering Physics I
PHYS 216 - Engineering Physics II
PHYS 217 - Engineering Physics III
PHYS 299 - Special Topics

Program Plan

NOTE: Click on the course title to display or hide course descriptions

 
Astronomy
1.0 credits ASTR-104: Spin: (special Interest)
Course is designed to address a variety of subject
Offered: DMND
1.0 - 3.0 credits ASTR-105: SPIN: (Special Interest)
Course is designed to address a variety of subjects required to meet the needs of lifelong learning students. Not available for transfer nor applicable as an elective.
4.0 credits ASTR-110: Intro to Astronomy
Observation, theories, and methods of modern astronomy. General study for non-science majors. [NM Common Course Number ASTR 1114, Area III; Laboratory Science Core]
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits ASTR-113: Constellation Mythology
A study of the ancient mythological stories and philosophies of world cultures as seen in the patterns of stars in the night sky. A basic grounding in Greco-Roman myths and representations of star patterns will be compared to other world cultures, including, but not limited to, Native American, Chinese, Arabic, South Pacific, and Arctic.
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits ASTR-120: Deep Space Astronomy
Conceptual study of cosmology and relativity, emphasizing the Einsteinian perceptions of gravity, matter, energy, and space-time geometry. Also examines in detail anomalistic subjects such as black holes, wormholes, "white fountains", and obstacles to superluminal ("faster than light") travel.
Prerequisites: Take ASTR-110.
Biology
1.0 credits BIOL-104: Spin: (special Interest) Spin: (special Interest)
Course is designed to address a variety of subjects.
Offered: DMND
1.0 - 3.0 credits BIOL-105: SPIN: (Special Interest)
Course is designed to address a variety of subjects required to meet the needs of lifelong learning students. Not available for transfer nor applicable as an elective.
Offered: DMND
4.0 credits BIOL-110: Non-Majors Biology
An understanding of how biological issues affect society is crucial for citizens of today's society. This non-majors course is an introduction to such issues as cloning; genetics, genetic screening and genetically modified organisms; global warming and the carbon cycle; population growth, environmental hazards, ecology, evolution and biodiversity, especially local flora. This course does not substitute for BIOL 121 or 122.
Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL-095 and RDNG-095 or appropriate Reading and English Accuplacer scores.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits BIOL-112: Human Body Structures & Functions
The organization, metabolic processes and regulation of cells and tissues. Basic concepts of the physical and chemical operation of the organs and systems of the human body. System review to include integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. This course does not substitute for BIOL 121, 252, or 253. Non-transferable.
Prerequisites: RDNG-095 or appropriate Reading Accuplacer score.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits BIOL-121: Introductory Biology I
An introduction to the basic processes of living organisms. Topics to be covered will include cell structure and function, cellular reproduction, metabolism, photosynthesis, the basic chemical processes, introductory biochemistry, energetics, enzyme structure and function, protein synthesis, and basic Mendelian genetics.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-095 , RDNG-113, and ENGL-099 or appropriate Math, Reading, and English Accuplacer scores.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits BIOL-122: Introductory Biology II
An introduction to dynamic processes of living things, and includes local natural history, population genetics, ecology and evolutionary dynamics.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-095 , RDNG-113, and ENGL-095 or appropriate Math, Reading, and English Accuplacer scores.
Offered: FASP
2.0 - 4.0 credits BIOL-210: Field Biology
A field oriented course to be offered during semester break, spring break, or the summer. This course will consist of travel and field-based biological education at distant sites. The course may involve attendance at one or more preparatory classes before field work begins. May require additional travel and accommodation fees.
Offered: DMND
4.0 credits BIOL-220: General Botany
This course is an introduction to plant biology for majors and non-majors. Topics include plant cell biology, anatomy, physiology, and pollination studies as well as phylogenetic study of Fungi and photosynthetic Bacteria and Protista. Plant ecology and introductory plant systematics will also be introduced.
Offered: DMND
4.0 credits BIOL-222: Invertebrate Zoology
This course will provide an introduction to all phyla of invertebrates, emphasizing the unifying characteristics within each group. It will examine how form relates to function, and differences in structure and physiology between phyla. Systematics and phylogenetic relationships will be discussed.
Prerequisites: Take BIOL-121 or BIOL-122.
Offered: FALL, Even Year
4.0 credits BIOL-223: Vertebrate Zoology
This course covers the taxa of animals with backbones: fishes, amphibians, reptiles (including birds) and mammals. It includes relationships, structure, niches and behaviors.
Prerequisites: Take BIOL-122.
Offered: FALL, Odd Year
4.0 credits BIOL-224: Microbiology
This course is an introductory survey of microorganisms including bacteria, protists, fungi and viruses. The course is not limited to the study of pathogenic species and will include taxonomy, ecology, microbial physiology, and gentics.
Prerequisites: Take BIOL-121. High school biology within the last three years may be accepted.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits BIOL-230: Environmental Conservation
Topics covered include the study of basic ecological principles, human population growth and its impact on the global environment, including air, water and land pollution; global climate change; renewable and non-renewable energy sources; and biodiversity.
Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL-099 and RDNG-113 or appropriate English and Reading Accuplacer scores.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits BIOL-237: Ethnobotany
Integrates classical botanical knowledge and identification techniques with historical and current native uses of plants for food, healing, fiber, housing, arts, and sacred activities. Although a broad view will be taken, this interdisciplinary course will emphasize the ethnobotany of the Four Corners region. The class may include field trips.
Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL-099 and RDNG-095 or appropriate Accuplacer English and Reading scores.
Offered: DMND
4.0 credits BIOL-240: Ecology
A study of the dynamics of biological systems. Covers population genetics, population ecology (interactions such as mutualism, competition and predation), and evolutionary theory.
Prerequisites: Take BIOL-122.
Offered: SP
4.0 credits BIOL-250: Systematic Botany
A study of classification and taxonomy of vascular plants. Topics covered in lecture and laboratory deal with taxonomic principles and philosophy, nomenclature, terminology, use of keys, and history of classification systems. The use of cytogenetics, anatomy, ecology, palynology, chemistry, and the computer in modern systematics is discussed. Students will learn to recognize many of the major plant families and will be taught the methods of botanical fieldwork. A plant collection will be made. Field trips are required, including a three-day excursion to southeastern Utah.
Offered: DMND
4.0 credits BIOL-252: Human Anatomy & Physiology I
The organization of cells and tissues and their metabolic and homeostatic processes and regulation. Physical and chemical operation of organs and systems of the human body, including the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.
Prerequisites: Take BIOL-121. CHEM-110 and HITP-110 is strongly recommended. High school biology within the last 3 years may be accepted.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits BIOL-253: Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Physical and chemical operation of the organs and systems of the human body, including endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive. Basic concepts of metabolism, energy, fluid and electrolyte balance, heredity and human development.
Prerequisites: Take Biol-252
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits BIOL-255: Introduction to Genetics
This course will provide an introduction to modern genetic principles, including mechanisms of inheritance (Mendelian rules and non-Mendelian inheritance), molecular genetics, population genetics, and modern genetic laboratory techniques.
Prerequisites: Take BIOL-121.
Offered: FALL
4.0 credits BIOL-260: Introduction to Cell Biology
A detailed look at the composition and organization of cells, biochemistry and bioenergetics, molecular genetics, and cellular interactions. Major modern research tools will also be explored.
Prerequisites: Take BIOL-121 and CHEM-111.
Offered: SP, Odd Year
3.0 credits BIOL-281: Pathophysiology I
This is the first of a two semester course designed for students pursuing degrees in allied health or biological sciences. The initial material covers the central concepts of cellular and tissue pathophysiology. Thereafter, a systematic survey of genetic diseases, cancer, and the diseases of the immune, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive systems is undertaken. The etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and other clinical considerations are discussed.
Prerequisites: Take BIOL-252.
Offered: SP
3.0 credits BIOL-282: Pathophysiology II
The second semester of pathophysiology builds on the information acquired during the first semester. The systematic survey of diseases continues with the hematologic, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, digestive, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems. The etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and other clinical considerations are discussed.
Prerequisites: Take BIOL-281.
Offered: SP
1.0 - 4.0 credits BIOL-298: Hnrs:spto Biology
1.0 - 4.0 credits BIOL-299: Special Topics
Special or specific topic course to meet the needs of students. Topics and credits are announced in the Schedule of Classes. These courses may be used as electives for Associate degree requirements. May be repeated one or more times for additional credit. No more than 6 credits of special topic courses can be used toward a degree.
Prerequisites: Take CHEM-251
Offered: FASP
Chemistry
Fall 1 Semester 
4.0 credits MATH-115: Intermediate Algebra-Applications
Instructs students in the knowledge of algebra involving nonlinear content including expressions, equations, functions and inequalities. This course emphasizes simplifying and solving methods for polynomial, quadratic, rational, absolute value, radical, exponential, and logarithmic expressions and equations.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-096 minimum grade C, or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
Spring 1 Semester 
4.0 credits MATH-170: Pre-Calculus
An in-depth study of linear, piecewise, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Also includes the fundamental theorem of algebra, systems of equations and inequalities, conic sections, sequences and series, and applications in geometry. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits MATH-180: Trigonometry
Instructs the student in the knowledge of triangles, radian and degree measure, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, polar coordinates, and vectors. Prepares the student to utilize trigonometry in the analysis of Calculus. Students need both Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus before entering Calculus I.[NM Common Course Number MATH 1213, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 minimum grade C, or appropriate Math Accuplacer Score.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits CHEM-110: Introductory Chemistry
An introductory survey of basic chemistry including scientific and dimensional analysis, states of matter, atomic and molecular structure, reaction dynamics, acid-base systems, and electrochemistry. Fulfills lab science requirement for non-science majors, and as an introductory course for students with no prior chemistry.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-096 or appropriate Accuplacer Math Score.
Offered: ALL
Fall 2 Semester 
4.0 credits CHEM-111: General Chemistry I
Part one of the general study of chemistry, including scientific and dimensional analysis, metathesis and redox reactions, thermochemistry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, gases, liquids, and solids. For engineering and pre-professional majors.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 or appropriate Accuplacer Math Score. Completion of CHEM 110 with a C or better or high school chemistry with a grade of B or better in the last 4 years.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits MATH-188: Calculus I
Instructs the student in the methods of differential calculus. Topics include elementary algebraic and transcendental functions, limits, continuity, differentiation and optimization. Other topics include L'hopital's rule, Newton's method, Riemann sums, indefinite and definite integration, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematical software will be utilized throughout the course to expose students to computer algebra systems. [NM Common Course Number MATH 1614, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: MATH-170 AND MATH-180, minimum grade C.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits ENGL-111: Freshman Composition
Emphasizes academic writing, intertextuality, and analysis of rhetorical situation through writing workshop and thematic readings. [NM Common Course Number ENGL 1113, Area I; Communications]
Prerequisites: ENGL-099 and RDNG-095 or appropriate English and Reading Accuplacer scores.
Offered: ALL
Spring 2 Semester 
4.0 credits CHEM-112: General Chemistry II
Part two of the general study of chemistry including kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base systems, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, industrial processes, and coordination chemistry. For engineering and pre-professional majors.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-160 and CHEM-111.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits MATH-189: Calculus II
A continuation of Math 188; extending to topics in Techniques of Integration, Numerical Integration, Applications of Integration, Infinite Series, Power Series, Maclaurin & Taylor Series and Taylor Polynomials.[NM Common Course Number MATH 1623, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Complete MATH-188 with a minimum grade of C.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits PHYS-211: Gen Physics I
Non-calculus treatment of Newtonian mechanics, fluids, and sound. Satisfies requirements for most pre-medical and pre-dental programs and some science programs. It is strongly recommended that this course is taken at the same time as PHYS-211L. [NM Common Course Number PHYS 1114, Area III; Laboratory Science Core]
Prerequisites: MATH-160 or MATH-170. RDNG-095 and ENGL-099 or appropriate Reading and English Accuplacer scores.
Offered: FASP
1.0 credits PHYS-211L: Gen Physics Lab I
This course is the first in a two-semester laboratory sequence, which accompanies the algebra-based introductory physics sequence (211,212). This course satisfies requirements for most pre-medical and pre-dental programs and some science programs. It is strongly recommended that this course is taken at the same time as PHYS-211. For students who have completed PHYS-211, this lab may be taken separately with permission of the instructor.
Corequisites: PHYS-211
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits ENGL-211: Advanced Composition
Develops rhetorical and expository writing skills. Explores a variety of forms and styles with emphasis on argument and academic research. [NM Common Course Number ENGL 1123, Area I; Communications]
Prerequisites: Take ENGL-111 and RDNG-113
Offered: ALL
Fall 3 Semester 
4.0 credits CHEM-251: Organic Chemistry I
Part one of the study of carbon compound chemistry covering: atomic and molecular orbitals; structure and reaction mechanisms of alkanes, alkenes, and alcohols; laboratory synthesis; gas chromatography; infrared, mass, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. For pre-professional majors.
Prerequisites: Take CHEM-112 or CHEM-111. CHEM-112 is recommended.
Offered: FALL
3.0 credits PHYS-212: General Physics II
A continuation of PHYS 211 in which electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics are studied. Strongly recommended this course be taken with PHYS-212L.[NM Common Course Number PHYS 1124, Area III; Laboratory Science Core]
Prerequisites: Take PHYS-211; minimum grade C
Offered: DMND
1.0 credits PHYS-212L: Gen Physics Lab II
This course is the second in a two-semester laboratory sequence, which accompanies the algebra-based introductory physics sequence (211,212). This course satisfies requirements for most pre-medical and pre-dental programs and some science programs. It is strongly recommended that this course is taken at the same time as PHYS-212. For students who have completed PHYS-212, this lab may be taken separately with permission of the instructor.
Corequisites: PHYS-212
Offered: DMND
3.0 credits COMM-110: Public Speaking
The purpose of this class is to develop students' public speaking skills so that they can become more confident and effective speakers. Students will write and present both persuasive and informative speeches. [NM Common Course Number COMM 1113, Area I; Communications]
Prerequisites: Placement into RDNG-095 and ENGL-095 or appropriate Reading and English Accuplacer scores.
Offered: ALL
Spring 3 Semester 
4.0 credits CHEM-252: Organic Chemistry II
Part two of the study of carbon compound chemistry covering: structure and reaction mechanisms of carboxyl, amine, conjugated, and polyfunctional systems; ultraviolet spectroscopy; bio-chemistry; and synthetic polymers.
Prerequisites: Take CHEM-251.
Offered: SP
5.0 credits CHEM-281: Analytical Chemistry
Fundamentals of instrumental chemical analysis. Topics include: statistical methods, digital control and data acquisition, gas/liquid chromatography, emission/absorption spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, volumetric, gravimetric, and electrochemical analysis. For chemistry and some pre-professional majors.
Prerequisites: Take CHEM-112.
Offered: SP
Elective 
4.0 credits CHEM-210: Organic Chemistry Survey
A one semester survey for students requiring a brief coverage of important classes of organic compounds and their application to metabolism. Coverage includes nomenclature, preparation, chemical transformations of functional groups and reaction mechanisms.
Prerequisites: Take CHEM-110 or CHEM-111.
Offered: SU
Students must also complete the following General Education requirements: 
  • 9 credits in English & Communications
  • 6-9 credits in Social & Behavioral Science
  • 6-9 credits in Humanities & Fine Arts
 
Engineering
3.0 credits ENGR-112: Introduction to Engineering
An introduction to engineering as a career. Issues important to engineers, as students and professionals, are discussed along with answers to the question, "What can I expect to do as an engineer?" In addition, basic computer skills and electronic data acquisition are introduced in a laboratory setting, emphasizing a hands-on approach to experimentation and team design.
Prerequisites: TAKE MATH-115
Corequisites: ENGL-111
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits ENGR-230: Engineering Circuit Analysis
Introductory engineering analysis of analog circuits. Topics include electrical component descriptions and equations (resistors, inductors, and capacitors), Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws, and calculus based formulation of network equations using time and frequency domain concepts.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-189.
Offered: FALL
3.0 credits ENGR-233: Mechanics-Statics
An introduction to basic engineering structural analysis of static (stationary) objects. Methods to examine external and internal forces on structural components are developed using vector methods.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-189 and PHYS-215.
Offered: FALL
3.0 credits ENGR-234: Mechanics-Dynamics
Expand your knowledge of statics to the study of systems in motion. Dynamics is divided into two parts: "kinematics" examines the geometric aspect of motion (where does it go?), and "kinetics" covers forces involved in motion (how should I design it?). Vector analysis methods are used throughout.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-189 and ENGR-233.
Offered: SP
3.0 credits ENGR-236: Thermodynamics
This first course in thermodynamics is applicable to all engineering disciplines (and modern society in general) as it deals with energy, and an "energy-balance" approach to problem solving. The first portion is devoted to energy, energy transfer, and physical properties. The first law of thermodynamics (which relates energy to heat and work) and the second law (specifies the direction of certain processes) are then covered in detail.
Minimum grade required: "C"
Prerequisites: TAKE PHYS-215
Offered: SP
1.0 - 4.0 credits ENGR-299: Special Topics
Special or specific topic course to meet the needs of students. Topics and credits are announced in the Schedule of Classes. These courses may be used as electives for Associate degree requirements. May be repeated one or more times for additional credit. No more than 6 credits of special topic courses can be used toward a degree.
Offered: DMND
Geographic Information Systems
4.0 credits GIST-115: Map Use, Interpretation & Des
The basic principles, functions, origins, use, interpretation, and cartographic design of maps will be covered through lecture discussion and lab exercises. Topics include understanding map projections, scale, direction, grids, color theory, display of qualitative and quantitative data, thematic, general reference, and special purpose maps.
Offered: FALL
4.0 credits GIST-118: Geospatial Analysis
This course studies symbology and categorization, quantity and pattern recognition through classification and density mapping for comparison. Inside-outside, distance and time-based analyses are also studied as well as displaying geospatial distributions and the use of spatial statistics to establish confidence levels for said analyses.
Offered: SP
4.0 credits GIST-120: GPS & Surveying Methods
This course provides an overview of global positioning systems. Topics include the theory, implementation, and operations of GPS. The fundamentals of acquiring GIS data using GPS technology, and surveying methods important for use in a GIS are also studied.
Offered: FALL
4.0 credits GIST-151: GIS I
This course covers the fundamentals of GIS theory and application. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how geographic features are represented, captured, and stored as digital data, and how that data may be analyzed and mapped using state-of-the-art GIS tools. Lab projects will develop hands-on expertise with industry standard software.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits GIST-201: GIS II
This course builds on the knowledge and skills developed in GIS I. This course provides more detailed instruction on the theories and procedures associated with the implementation of GIS projects, their management, and their completion. Emphasis will be placed on in-depth spatial analysis and applications of GIS in a wide variety of fields. Research, analysis, and GIS methods will be covered in lecture through case studies and real-world examples. Hands-on expertise will be further developed.
Offered: FALL
4.0 credits GIST-230: Geographic Image Analysis
This course will cover the foundation of remote sensing, aerial photo interpretation, the use of imagery in GIS, and 3D visualization through lecture and lab. Students will engage in specific applications such as image classification and multi-spectral analysis to solve real world urban and environmental problems. Applications may include analyses of land use/land cover, planning, transportation, public safety, vegetation, biodiversity, ecology, water resources, and geology.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits GIST-270: Advanced GIS
Advanced topics in GIS will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on research methods, analysis, and GIS project planning, implementation, and management. Students will select a project of interest to work on through out the semester. Students may select a research topic, build a GIS, or design a user application working in groups or individually. This is a capstone course for the GIST degree.
Offered: SP
1.0 - 3.0 credits GIST-285: GIS Internship
Internships and fieldwork comprise a significant portion of the students' work in this Geographic Information Systems course (GIS). This course provides the opportunity to interact with a municipal, industrial, or service organization. Emphasis is placed on defining a question, gathering and analyzing pertinent data, and drawing conclusions leading to question resolution. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate their command of GIS/GPS applications for problem solving.
Geology
1.0 credits GEOL-104: Spin: (special Interest)
Course is designed to address a variety of subject
Offered: DMND
1.0 - 3.0 credits GEOL-105: SPIN: (Special Interest)
Course is designed to address a variety of subjects required to meet the needs of lifelong learning students. Not available for transfer nor applicable as an elective.
4.0 credits GEOL-110: Introduction to Geology
A study of the composition and structure of the earth, including plate tectonics, minerals, the rock cycle, mountain building, energy resources, and natural hazards such as volcanoes, earthquakes, and landslides. This class includes optional weekend field trips.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits GEOL-111: Historical Geology
The geologic history and development of life on the earth as recorded by rocks and fossils. Special consideration is given to plate tectonics and fossils in the lectures and to fossils and geologic maps in the laboratories. This class includes a field trip.
Prerequisites: Take GEOL-110.
Offered: SP
4.0 credits GEOL-120: Intro to Petroleum Geology
This course will study various aspects of petroleum geology and fossil fuels. Content will include formation and classification of regional sedimentary rocks, geologic history of the Four Corners Region, and formation, detection, and extraction of oil, natural gas, and coal. This class includes field trips.
Offered: SU
4.0 credits GEOL-270: Mineralogy
A study of elementary crystallography. Topics covered include description, identification, classification, chemistry, and occurrence of minerals that form common rocks and ore deposits. This class includes a field trip.
Prerequisites: Take GEOL-110.
Offered: FALL
4.0 credits GEOL-271: Petrology
The origin, classification, and identification of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. This class includes a field trip.
Prerequisites: Take GEOL-270.
Offered: SP
1.0 - 4.0 credits GEOL-290: Special Topics
Specific subjects and credits to be announced in the schedule of classes.
1.0 - 4.0 credits GEOL-298: HNRS-SPTO: (special Topics)

Offered: ALL Faculty Permission Required
1.0 - 6.0 credits GEOL-299: Directed Study
Special or specific topic course to meet the needs of students. Topics and credits are announced in the Schedule of Classes. These courses may be used as electives for Associate degree requirements. May be repeated one or more times for additional credit. No more than 6 credits of special topic courses can be used toward a degree.
Offered: DMND
General Science
4.0 credits BIOL-121: Introductory Biology I
An introduction to the basic processes of living organisms. Topics to be covered will include cell structure and function, cellular reproduction, metabolism, photosynthesis, the basic chemical processes, introductory biochemistry, energetics, enzyme structure and function, protein synthesis, and basic Mendelian genetics.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-095 , RDNG-113, and ENGL-099 or appropriate Math, Reading, and English Accuplacer scores.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits BIOL-122: Introductory Biology II
An introduction to dynamic processes of living things, and includes local natural history, population genetics, ecology and evolutionary dynamics.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-095 , RDNG-113, and ENGL-095 or appropriate Math, Reading, and English Accuplacer scores.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits CHEM-111: General Chemistry I
Part one of the general study of chemistry, including scientific and dimensional analysis, metathesis and redox reactions, thermochemistry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, gases, liquids, and solids. For engineering and pre-professional majors.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 or appropriate Accuplacer Math Score. Completion of CHEM 110 with a C or better or high school chemistry with a grade of B or better in the last 4 years.
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits CHEM-112: General Chemistry II
Part two of the general study of chemistry including kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base systems, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, industrial processes, and coordination chemistry. For engineering and pre-professional majors.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-160 and CHEM-111.
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits COSC-111: Computer Literacy
The evolution of computers, their application and their economic and social implications including a brief introduction to programming and computer literacy with a non-technical emphasis. For non-computing majors.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-050, ENGL-095, and RDNG-050 or appropriate Accuplacer scores in Math, English, and Reading.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits GEOL-110: Introduction to Geology
A study of the composition and structure of the earth, including plate tectonics, minerals, the rock cycle, mountain building, energy resources, and natural hazards such as volcanoes, earthquakes, and landslides. This class includes optional weekend field trips.
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits PHYS-211: Gen Physics I
Non-calculus treatment of Newtonian mechanics, fluids, and sound. Satisfies requirements for most pre-medical and pre-dental programs and some science programs. It is strongly recommended that this course is taken at the same time as PHYS-211L. [NM Common Course Number PHYS 1114, Area III; Laboratory Science Core]
Prerequisites: MATH-160 or MATH-170. RDNG-095 and ENGL-099 or appropriate Reading and English Accuplacer scores.
Offered: FASP
1.0 credits PHYS-211L: Gen Physics Lab I
This course is the first in a two-semester laboratory sequence, which accompanies the algebra-based introductory physics sequence (211,212). This course satisfies requirements for most pre-medical and pre-dental programs and some science programs. It is strongly recommended that this course is taken at the same time as PHYS-211. For students who have completed PHYS-211, this lab may be taken separately with permission of the instructor.
Corequisites: PHYS-211
Offered: FASP
Horticulture
1.0 credits HORT-104: Spin: (special Interest)
Course is designed to address a varity of subjects
Offered: DMND
4.0 credits HORT-110: Introduction to Xeriscape Principles
Scientific exploration into the components of xeriscape principles and practices. It includes plant identification and mechanisms, landscape design, construction, and maintenance, plant selection, and mulching.
Offered: FALL
4.0 credits HORT-115: Ornamental Xeric Plant Identification
Seeks to expose students to native and drought tolerant ornamental landscape plants. Plants covered in this course will include a study of woody plant material (trees, shrubs and vines), and herbaceous plant material (annual and perennial flowers). Identification methods will reinforce plants covered in the course. At the end of the course, students will have learned to identify economically important native and drought adapted plant material for use in xeric landscape designs.
Prerequisites: Take HORT-110
Offered: SP
3.0 credits HORT-121: Horticulture Techniques I
Introduction to basic ornamental horticulture. Topics include introductory plant science, nutritional requirements, plant pathology, entomology, propagation techniques, and basic horticultural skills.
Offered: FALL
3.0 credits HORT-122: Horticulture Techniques II
An extension of HORT 121, Horticulture Techniques II will introduce pruning techniques, soil science, groundcover and turfgrass science, and plant identification focusing on xeric and native plants and invasive plant species.
Offered: SP
4.0 credits HORT-130: Xeriscape Design & Maintenance
Examines landscape design principles with emphasis on water and energy conservation. Topics explore plant combination theory and xeriscape irrigation techniques, installation, and maintenance. Students will complete a landscape design using xeriscape principles.
Offered: FALL
1.0 - 4.0 credits HORT-195: Special Topics

Offered: ALL
3.0 credits HORT-220: Irrigation Principles & Design
Wise water use includes proper irrigation design, installation, use and maintenance with focus on using weather-based approach, proper use of electronic irrigation devices and aids.
Offered: SP
4.0 credits HORT-230: Diagnosing Plant Disorders
This class focuses on plant pathology, entomology, plant nutrition disorders, and weed science with an emphasis on non-pesticide prevention and treatment.
Offered: DMND
4.0 credits HORT-280: Xeriscape Special Problems
Required hands-on team project provides an opportunity for students to apply the resource-conserving urban landscape skills developed during the program. Projects will include but are not limited to establishment and maintenance of the San Juan College Xeric and Native Display Garden, other local display gardens especially in conjunction with City Parks and Recreation Department, and establishment of San Juan College nature trail.
1.0 - 6.0 credits HORT-285: Cooperative Education
Off-campus work experience provides more opportunity for applying techniques developed during the course of the program. This course provides the opportunity to interact with a commercial, municipal, or service organization. Emphasis is placed on applying xeric landscape principals including design, plant and ground cover choices rather than traditional landscape techniques.
Offered: DMND
1.0 - 4.0 credits HORT-290: Special Topics

Offered: ALL
1.0 - 4.0 credits HORT-295: SPTO: Special Topics

Offered: ALL
1.0 - 6.0 credits HORT-299: SPTO: (Special Topics)
Special or specific topic course to meet the needs of students. Topics and credits are announced in the Schedule of Classes. These courses may be used as electives for Associate degree requirements. May be repeated one or more times for additional credit. No more than 6 credits of special topic courses can be used toward a degree.
Mathematics
3.0 credits MATH-050: Fundamental Mathematics
Basic addition,subtraction,multiplication,division of whole numbers, fractions and workshops to overcome math & test taking anxiety. S/U grading (RR Option). Students allowed two attempts to complete the course.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits MATH-095: Pre-Algebra
Instructs the student on the basic operations of arithmetic applied to whole numbers, integers, fractions and decimals. Topics include measurement conversions, scientific notation, percents, ratios and proportions, basic geometry, formulas and the introduction of variable expressions and linear equations.(RR option course)
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-050 or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits MATH-096: Introductory Algebra
Instructs students in the knowledge of algebra involving linear content; equations, functions and inequalities in one variable and two variables. This course demonstrates simplifying and solving methods. Topics such as expressions, equations, functions, exponents, two and three-dimensional geometric shapes, linear systems, polynomials, and factoring are also introduced.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-095 with a minimum grade of C or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
1.0 credits MATH-104: SPIN: Special Interest
3.0 credits MATH-113: Math for Technical Careers
Instructs students in the knowledge of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Topics also include ratios and proportions, percents, standard and metric measurements and conversions. Basic fundamentals of algebra, operations of rational numbers, algebraic expressions, solving equations, formulas, geometry and trigonometric concepts of sine, cosine, tangent and the Pythagorean Theorem. This course emphasizes application models required in vocational programs.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-095 with a minimum grade of C or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits MATH-114: Math for Health Careers
This course introduces the computational skills needed to study in health careers programs. Topics include operations on fractions, decimals, percents, as well as the use of formulas, ratio and proportion, and measurement. Students will solve word problems specific to medication orders.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-095 minimum grade C, or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits MATH-115: Intermediate Algebra-Applications
Instructs students in the knowledge of algebra involving nonlinear content including expressions, equations, functions and inequalities. This course emphasizes simplifying and solving methods for polynomial, quadratic, rational, absolute value, radical, exponential, and logarithmic expressions and equations.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-096 minimum grade C, or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits MATH-116: Math for High Tech Careers
Instructs students in the knowledge of mathematics related to the electronics field. Topics include: scientific calculations, conversions, methods of algebra leading to solving and manipulation of formulas, relations, functions including logarithmic and exponential, radicals, fundamentals of trigonometry involving angular and circular functions, vectors and phasors.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-096 minimum grade C, or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits MATH-121: Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher
Course offers an in-depth look at the representations of rational numbers, including base-ten and decimal numbers, integers, fractions, arithmetic operations on these sets and number properties using student activities and investigations. Problem solving is emphasized throughout.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-096 or higher, minimum grade C.
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits MATH-122: Math for Elementary Teacher II
Algebra from the viewpoint of the elementary curriculum with emphasis on proportional and linear relationships. Additional topics include: number theory, ratio, percent, probability and statistics. Student activities, investigations and problem solving are emphasized throughout.
Prerequisites: Complete MATH-121 with a C or better.
Offered: FALL
3.0 credits MATH-130: Conceptual Mathematics
This course covers a variety of practical mathematical concepts for non-science majors. Topics include set theory, geometry, counting methods, probability, statistics, and finance. Critical thinking and problem solving skills are stressed.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-096 minimum grade C, or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits MATH-160: College Algebra
Instructs students in the knowledge of linear, piecewise, quadratic, polynomial rational, inverse, exponential, and logarithmic functions; function topics include finding the average rate of change, analyzing graphs, graphing using transformations, finding roots in the real and complex number systems, and constructing functions to model real-world applications. Other topics include systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming sequences and series.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits MATH-170: Pre-Calculus
An in-depth study of linear, piecewise, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Also includes the fundamental theorem of algebra, systems of equations and inequalities, conic sections, sequences and series, and applications in geometry. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits MATH-180: Trigonometry
Instructs the student in the knowledge of triangles, radian and degree measure, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, polar coordinates, and vectors. Prepares the student to utilize trigonometry in the analysis of Calculus. Students need both Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus before entering Calculus I.[NM Common Course Number MATH 1213, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 minimum grade C, or appropriate Math Accuplacer Score.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits MATH-187: Applications of Calculus
An introduction to the methods of differential and integral calculus. Polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions are used in topics such as rates of change, limits, derivatives, continuity, extrema, graphing, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and techniques of integration. Applications involving optimization, related rates, growth and decay models, and marginality will be studied primarily in context of business related topics.
Prerequisites: Complete MATH-160 or MATH-170, minimum grade C.
Offered: SP
4.0 credits MATH-188: Calculus I
Instructs the student in the methods of differential calculus. Topics include elementary algebraic and transcendental functions, limits, continuity, differentiation and optimization. Other topics include L'hopital's rule, Newton's method, Riemann sums, indefinite and definite integration, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematical software will be utilized throughout the course to expose students to computer algebra systems. [NM Common Course Number MATH 1614, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: MATH-170 AND MATH-180, minimum grade C.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits MATH-189: Calculus II
A continuation of Math 188; extending to topics in Techniques of Integration, Numerical Integration, Applications of Integration, Infinite Series, Power Series, Maclaurin & Taylor Series and Taylor Polynomials.[NM Common Course Number MATH 1623, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Complete MATH-188 with a minimum grade of C.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits MATH-215: Math for Elem & Middle School Teachers
Develops basic geometric concepts including rigid transformations and congruence; dilations and similarity; length, area and volume; systems of measurement and unit conversions; connections to coordinate geometry. Problem solving is emphasized throughout.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C or better.
Offered: SP
3.0 credits MATH-231: Discrete Mathematics
An introductory course encompassing set theory, logic, induction and recursion, number theory, matrices, combinatorics, graph theory, trees, boolean algebra, and models of computation.
Prerequisites: Complete MATH-188 with a minimum grade of C.
Offered: SP
4.0 credits MATH-251: Statistics
Instructs the student in the knowledge of an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, which includes the following topics: sampling theory, experimental design, probability, probability distributions, confidence intervals, correlation and regression, tests of hypotheses (using the normal, student-t, chi-square, and F-distributions) and ANOVA. Lab time is provided for data analysis using statistical software. [NM Common Course Number MATH 2113, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 minimum grade C, or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits MATH-268: Calculus III
Instructs the student in the techniques of multivariable calculus. Topics include partial differentiation, linear and quadratic approximations, optimization, multiple integration, vector fields, line and flux integrals, curl, divergence, and the three fundamental theorems.[NM Common Course Number MATH 2614, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Take MATH-189 with a minimum grade of C.
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits MATH-275: Linear Algebra
An applications approach to introductory linear algebra. Covers systems of linear equations, matrices, linear independence, vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and applications.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-189 with minimum grade of C.
Offered: DMND
4.0 credits MATH-282: Differential Equations
A course which gives an in-depth introduction to ordinary differential equations. Theoretical questions such as existence and uniqueness will be addressed but emphasis will be on concepts and applications. Topics include first order techniques and applications, second order techniques and applications, Laplace Transform methods, Cauchy-Euler equations, infinite series techniques, systems, numerical techniques and qualitative aspects.[NM Common Course Number MATH 2814, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Complete MATH-268 with a minimum grade of C.
Offered: SP
1.0 - 9.0 credits MATH-290: SPTO:(Special Topics)
Topics and credits to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Maximum of 3 credits per semester. Total credits not to exceed 6 credits. Semester Offered On Demand.
Offered: DMND
3.0 - 3.0 credits MATH-298: HNRS:concept Appr to Arit
Physics
Spring 1 Semester 
4.0 credits MATH-115: Intermediate Algebra-Applications
Instructs students in the knowledge of algebra involving nonlinear content including expressions, equations, functions and inequalities. This course emphasizes simplifying and solving methods for polynomial, quadratic, rational, absolute value, radical, exponential, and logarithmic expressions and equations.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-096 minimum grade C, or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
Summer 1 Semester 
4.0 credits MATH-170: Pre-Calculus
An in-depth study of linear, piecewise, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Also includes the fundamental theorem of algebra, systems of equations and inequalities, conic sections, sequences and series, and applications in geometry. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 or appropriate Math Accuplacer score.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits MATH-180: Trigonometry
Instructs the student in the knowledge of triangles, radian and degree measure, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, polar coordinates, and vectors. Prepares the student to utilize trigonometry in the analysis of Calculus. Students need both Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus before entering Calculus I.[NM Common Course Number MATH 1213, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 minimum grade C, or appropriate Math Accuplacer Score.
Offered: ALL
Fall 2 Semester 
4.0 credits MATH-188: Calculus I
Instructs the student in the methods of differential calculus. Topics include elementary algebraic and transcendental functions, limits, continuity, differentiation and optimization. Other topics include L'hopital's rule, Newton's method, Riemann sums, indefinite and definite integration, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Mathematical software will be utilized throughout the course to expose students to computer algebra systems. [NM Common Course Number MATH 1614, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: MATH-170 AND MATH-180, minimum grade C.
Offered: ALL
4.0 credits CHEM-111: General Chemistry I
Part one of the general study of chemistry, including scientific and dimensional analysis, metathesis and redox reactions, thermochemistry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, gases, liquids, and solids. For engineering and pre-professional majors.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-115 or appropriate Accuplacer Math Score. Completion of CHEM 110 with a C or better or high school chemistry with a grade of B or better in the last 4 years.
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits ENGL-111: Freshman Composition
Emphasizes academic writing, intertextuality, and analysis of rhetorical situation through writing workshop and thematic readings. [NM Common Course Number ENGL 1113, Area I; Communications]
Prerequisites: ENGL-099 and RDNG-095 or appropriate English and Reading Accuplacer scores.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits COSC-118: Comp Programming Fund I w/C++
An introduction to programming and computing integrating problem solving and algorithmic design using the object- oriented programming language C++.
Prerequisites: Completion of MATH-096, ENGL-095, and RDNG-095 or appropriate Accuplacer scores in Math, English, and Reading.
Offered: FASP
Spring 2 Semester 
4.0 credits MATH-189: Calculus II
A continuation of Math 188; extending to topics in Techniques of Integration, Numerical Integration, Applications of Integration, Infinite Series, Power Series, Maclaurin & Taylor Series and Taylor Polynomials.[NM Common Course Number MATH 1623, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Complete MATH-188 with a minimum grade of C.
Offered: ALL
3.0 credits PHYS-215: Engineering Physics I
A calculus level treatment of classical mechanics and waves. Physics principles are emphasized and illustrated by examples and problem practice. Strongly recommended that students have previously taken high school physics or PHYS 111. Strongly recommend that this course be taken with PHYS 215L.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-188 or higher with a minimum grade of C.
Offered: FASP
1.0 credits PHYS-215L: Engineering Physics Lab I
This course is the first in a two-semester laboratory sequence, which accompanies the calculus-based introductory physics sequence (215,216). For students who have completed PHYS-215, this lab may be taken separately with permission of the instructor.
Corequisites: PHYS-215
Offered: FASP
4.0 credits CHEM-112: General Chemistry II
Part two of the general study of chemistry including kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base systems, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, industrial processes, and coordination chemistry. For engineering and pre-professional majors.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-160 and CHEM-111.
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits ENGL-211: Advanced Composition
Develops rhetorical and expository writing skills. Explores a variety of forms and styles with emphasis on argument and academic research. [NM Common Course Number ENGL 1123, Area I; Communications]
Prerequisites: Take ENGL-111 and RDNG-113
Offered: ALL
Fall 3 Semester 
4.0 credits MATH-268: Calculus III
Instructs the student in the techniques of multivariable calculus. Topics include partial differentiation, linear and quadratic approximations, optimization, multiple integration, vector fields, line and flux integrals, curl, divergence, and the three fundamental theorems.[NM Common Course Number MATH 2614, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Take MATH-189 with a minimum grade of C.
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits PHYS-216: Engineering Physics II
A calculus level treatment of topics in gravitation, electricity, and magnetism. It is strongly recommended that this course is taken at the same time as PHYS-216L.
Prerequisites: Take PHYS-215 and MATH-189, minimum grade of C.
Offered: FASP
1.0 credits PHYS-216L: Engineering Physics Lab II
This course is the second in a two-semester laboratory sequence, which accompanies the calculus-based introductory physics sequence (215,216). It is strongly recommended that this course is taken at the same time as PHYS-216. For students who have completed PHYS-216, this lab may be taken separately with permission of the instructor.
Corequisites: PHYS-216
Offered: FASP
3.0 credits ENGR-230: Engineering Circuit Analysis
Introductory engineering analysis of analog circuits. Topics include electrical component descriptions and equations (resistors, inductors, and capacitors), Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws, and calculus based formulation of network equations using time and frequency domain concepts.
Prerequisites: Take MATH-189.
Offered: FALL
3.0 credits COMM-110: Public Speaking
The purpose of this class is to develop students' public speaking skills so that they can become more confident and effective speakers. Students will write and present both persuasive and informative speeches. [NM Common Course Number COMM 1113, Area I; Communications]
Prerequisites: Placement into RDNG-095 and ENGL-095 or appropriate Reading and English Accuplacer scores.
Offered: ALL
or 
3.0 credits COMM-111: Interpersonal Communication
This course is designed to increase student's awareness of the role that interpersonal communication plays in creating and maintaining personal and professional relationships. Emphasis of instruction is on improving one-to-one communication skills. Topics covered include self-concept, perception, non-verbal communication, listening, feedback, and effective use of language. [NM Common Course Number COMM 1213, Area I; Communications]
Prerequisites: Placement into RDNG-095 and ENGL-095 or appropriate Reading and English Accuplacer scores.
Offered: ALL
Spring 3 Semester 
4.0 credits MATH-282: Differential Equations
A course which gives an in-depth introduction to ordinary differential equations. Theoretical questions such as existence and uniqueness will be addressed but emphasis will be on concepts and applications. Topics include first order techniques and applications, second order techniques and applications, Laplace Transform methods, Cauchy-Euler equations, infinite series techniques, systems, numerical techniques and qualitative aspects.[NM Common Course Number MATH 2814, Area II: Mathematics Core]
Prerequisites: Complete MATH-268 with a minimum grade of C.
Offered: SP
3.0 credits PHYS-217: Engineering Physics III
A calculus level treatment of optics, special relativity, and atomic structure.
Prerequisites: Take PHYS-216 with a minimum grade C.
Offered: DMND
3.0 credits ENGR-236: Thermodynamics
This first course in thermodynamics is applicable to all engineering disciplines (and modern society in general) as it deals with energy, and an "energy-balance" approach to problem solving. The first portion is devoted to energy, energy transfer, and physical properties. The first law of thermodynamics (which relates energy to heat and work) and the second law (specifies the direction of certain processes) are then covered in detail.
Minimum grade required: "C"
Prerequisites: TAKE PHYS-215
Offered: SP
3.0 credits ECON-251: Macroeconomics
Covers supply and demand, the danger of price controls, the role of government in free markets, international trade, international finance, currency exchange rates, purchasing power parity, the balance of payments, the tax structure, national income accounting, elements of long-run economic growth, inflation, unemployment, the business cycle, economic models explaining changes in the business cycle, fiscal policy, monetary policy, and the money supply. The application of economics to the financial markets is stressed along with economic indicators. [NM Common Course Number ECON 2113, Area IV; Behavioral/Social Science Core]
Prerequisites: Take RDNG-095, ENGL-099, and MATH-096 or appropriate Reading, English and Math Accuplacer Scores.
Offered: ALL
or 
3.0 credits ECON-252: Microeconomics
Covers the history of economic development, comparisons of the major economic systems, supply and demand, price controls, price elasticity of demand, the distribution of income, social security, problems with measuring income demographic effects on the economy, the cost structure of firms, perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, economies of scale, monopoly regulation, labor markets and an examination of the economy's effect on the environment. The application of economics to the financial markets is stressed. [NM Common Course Number ECON 2123, Area IV; Behavioral/Social Science Core]
Prerequisites: Take RDNG-095, ENGL-099 and MATH-096 or appropriate Reading, English and Math Accuplacer Scores.
Offered: ALL
Students must also complete the following General Education requirements: 
  • 6-9 credits in Social & Behavioral Science
  • 6-9 credits in Humanities & Fine Arts
 
 

For more information, please call Vernon Willie at (505) 566-3306. Or send us an email at williev@sanjuancollege.edu.