Humanities Balcony Gallery

Trees-Trees-And Other Things

October 8 - November 6, 2009

Reception: Thursday, October 8 – 3 to 5 p.m.

Dick Secor

An array of colorful still life, landscape and figurative paintings will be the focus of Trees-Trees-And Other Things, an art show featuring the work of Dick Secor, October 8 – November 6, in the San Juan College Humanities Gallery. An opening reception will be held Thursday, October 8, from 3 to 5 pm.

With a style that is always evolving, Secor experiments with various objects such as combs, razor blades and squeegees to create just the right dept and texture of tree bark in his paintings. He often finds his inspiration from the black and white photographs his wife has taken.

"My style is primarily impressionistic," he explains. "However, ultimately the style of any given piece will be the result of how I feel about that particular scene at the time I'm painting it. This holds true for a landscape or a still life, Plein Air or in the studio."

This year, much of his work is geared toward preparation for the 2010 Nomades del Arte Plein Air Exhibit. So he has spent a good deal of his time painting Plein air in the dramatic landscapes of New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado. He often creates small, quick studies on location that allow him to capture the light and mood of a setting in the moment, and then he later transfers the scene on a larger canvas in his studio.

Dick Secor

 

J. Richard Secor, works primarily in acrylic, enjoying the texture, vibrant color, freedom and exuberance of this medium. His hope is to create an image that evokes a mood or a memory that brings pleasure to the viewer. J. Richard is known for his use of bold, striking colors applied with both brush and palette knife in a free and loose manner.

Artist's Statement

Dick Secor

I am continuously self-taught - meaning that my style is always evolving through curiosity, intense observation, sudden inspiration and experimentation. For example, I have experimented with using combs, razor blades, squeegees and my thumb in my quest to create just the right depth and texture of tree bark in my paintings. As a result, my wife Melissa now hides her toothbrush from me, and I am the prime suspect in the recent disappearance of her hair pick.

Melissa’s black and white photographs have recently become my painting inspiration. I felt challenged to see if I could create the same quiet and lonely mood of a black and white photograph in my paintings. The result was the piece, Aspens and Pines in Black and White, which actually has three colors, but which overall captures the look and feel of black and white.

My style is primarily impressionistic, but ultimately the style of any given painting will be the result of how I feel about that particular scene at the time I’m painting it. This holds true for a landscape or a still life, Plein Air or in the studio. Sometimes I see a scene as impressionistic or abstract or a combination of these styles. There are also those times when the brush and palette knife seems to have minds of their own!

Plein air painting typically provides me with a more playful and semi abstract-impressionistic style than does a studio piece. These paintings also produce fresher, more spontaneous colors and less detail, as I have to paint faster.

When I am painting in the studio, music plays a key role in how the style of the painting I’m working on emerges. The piece Arroyo Seco de Montana was painted to the lively and dramatic guitar music of Ottmar Liebert and Esteban, and has a variety of brush and palette knife strokes, much color and lots of activity. The painting Sunset Mesa reflects the serenity and calm inspired by the mellow Native American flute of R. Carlos Nakai

I do study the techniques of painters whose work I admire – however I take these techniques and convert them into my artistic presentation within my own style.

This year, much of my painting is geared toward preparation for the 2010 Nomades del Arte Plein Air Exhibit. As a result, I have been spending more time painting Plein air in the amazing and dramatic landscapes of New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado. I often create small, quick studies on location, which allow me to capture the light and mood of a setting in the moment, and which I can later recapture on larger canvas upon returning to my studio.

Please visit the J. Richard Secor website for more information.

The Humanities Art Gallery is located in the Humanities balcony in the West Classroom Complex.
It is open Monday through Thursday, from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., and on Fridays, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For further information about this exhibit or other Gallery events, contact Cindy McNealy at 566-3464.