The safety of everyone at San Juan College is our top priority.  To aid us in providing a safe campus for everyone we ask that you familiarize yourself with the following response checklist.  These checklist outline response for all students, employees and guest of San Juan College in the event of an emergency on campus.  If you have any questions or would like more details, please contact the San Juan College Security and Safety Department at 566-3263 or 215-3091 anytime.

ACTIVE SHOOTER INCIDENT

SECURE IMMEDIATE AREA:

  • Shut doors
  • If possible lock and barricade doors
  • Turn off lights
  • Close blinds
  • Turn off radios and computer monitors
  • Keep occupants calm, quiet and out of sight
  • Keep yourself out of sight and take adequate cover/protection, i.e. concrete walls, thick desks, filing cabinets (cover may protect you from bullets
  • Remove items from tops of desk
  • Silence cell phones
  • Place signs in exterior windows to identify the location of injured persons

RELEASING AN AREA:

  • Consider risks before releasing or leaving an area
  • Remember, the shooter will not stop until they are engaged by an outside force
  • Attempts to rescue people should only be attempted if it can be accomplished without further endangering the persons inside a secured area
  • Consider the safety of masses-vs.-the safety of a few
  • If doubt exists for the safety of the individuals inside the room, the area should remain secured

CONTACTING AUTHORITIES:

  • Emergency Services — 911
  • Department of Public Safety — 566-3333 or 215-3091
  • Be aware that the 911 system will likely be overwhelmed. Program the San Juan College Department of Public Safety administrative line (566-3263) into cell phone for emergency use or consider e-mail. E-mail may be an option when unable to speak. Security personnel monitors e-mail during an emergency event.

WHAT TO REPORT:

  • Your specific location-building and office or room number
  • Number of people at your specific location
  • Injuries-number of injured and types of injuries
  • Assailant(s)-location, the number of assailants, race/gender, clothing description, physical features, type of weapons (long gun or hand gun), backpack, shooters identity if known, separate explosions from gunfire, etc.

POLICE RESPONSE:

  • Objective is to immediately engage assailants
  • Evacuate victims
  • Facilitate follow-up medical care, interviews, counseling
  • Investigation

EXPLOSION ON CAMPUS

IMMEDIATE ACTION:

  • Immediately take cover under a table, desk or other object that will give protection against falling glass or debris
  • After the immediate effects of the explosion and/or fire have subsided, immediately call 911 and then notify the Security and Safety Department at 566-3333
  • Give your name and describe the location and nature of the emergency
  • If safe to do so, evacuate at the nearest marked exit and advise others to do the same
  • Do not use elevators to evacuate
  • Once outside move to a clear area that is at least 500 feet away from any affected buildings and keep streets and walkways clear for emergency vehicles and crews
  • DO NOT return to an affected area unless instructed to do so by Emergency Personnel
  • DO NOT use fire alarms to evacuate a building unless ordered to do so by Emergency Personnel, if the cause of the explosion was an explosive or incendiary device another may be connected to the fire alarms

CONTACTING AUTHORITIES:

  • Emergency Services — 911
  • Department of Public Safety — 566-3333 or 215-3091
  • Be aware that the 911 system will likely be overwhelmed. Program the San Juan College Department of Public Safety administrative line (566-3263) into cell phone for emergency use or consider e-mail. E-mail may be an option when unable to speak. E-mail is monitored by Security personnel during an emergency event.

GAS/PIPELINE DISRUPTION

AWARENESS:

  • Smell – Be mindful or unusual or “petroleum” odors near a pipeline
  • Sight – Watch for dead or discolored vegetation along a pipeline easement, also be wary of unusual pools or puddles of liquid and clouds of vapor or mist, blowing dirt and bubbles in standing water are also danger signs
  • Sound – Listen for a hissing or a roaring sound, the loudness depends on the leak size

DON’T:

  • Light a match
  • Start an engine
  • Switch lights on or off
  • Switch electrical equipment on or off
  • Turn machinery on or off
  • Drive/walk into a vapor could or into liquid puddles
  • Use a telephone of any kind until in a safe area
  • Create heat or sparks
  • Contact escaping materials
  • Move downwind

ACTION:

  • Leave the area on foot immediately
  • Leave all equipment and machinery “as is”
  • Get to a safe location and contact authorities
  • Warn others
  • Move upwind
  • Move downhill

CONTACTING AUTHORITIES:

  • Emergency Services — 911
  • Department of Public Safety — 566-3333 or 215-3091
  • Be aware that the 911 system will likely be overwhelmed. Program the San Juan College Department of Public Safety administrative line (566-3263) into cell phone for emergency use or consider e-mail. E-mail may be an option when unable to speak. E-mail is monitored by Security personnel during an emergency event.

HAZARDOUS MATERIAL SPILL CLEANUP

Remember spills should only be cleaned up by lab personnel if you and your supervisor feel that it is safe to do so.

GUIDELINES FOR SPILL CLEANUP INCLUDE:

  • For any spill immediately contact the San Juan College Environmental Health Department and/or Security and Safety Department
  • You are thoroughly familiar with the hazards of the material (Reference MSDS)
  • You have been trained to deal with spills/releases of the size in question
  • You have the proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), should it be necessary
  • The appropriate absorbent/neutralizers are readily available
  • It is essential that you collect all spill clean-up waste for proper disposal. DO NOT PLACE IN OR AROUND THE REGULAR TRASH
  • Place the spill clean-up waste in a closed container and attach a San Juan College Waste/Material Tracking form if available, or at a minimum label with contents

For more information on MSDS please use the following link:http://hq.msdsonline.com/sanjuancollege/Search/Default.aspx

If you or your supervisor feels that you do not have the proper training or equipment necessary to clean up a spill/release then call the San Juan College Environmental Health Department or the Department of Public Safety for cleanup.

CONTACTING AUTHORITIES:

  • Environmental Health
    • Gary Lee: 566-3063 or 320-3174
    • Monica Beevers: 566-3190 or 793-7874
  • Department of Public Safety — 566-3333 or 215-3091

HAZARDOUS MATERIAL SPILL/RELEASE EMERGENCY

A spill or release that poses an immediate threat to the individual and/or other occupants in the building should be handled with the following procedures:

  • If appropriate sound the fire alarm to evacuate the building
  • Call 911 from a safe location and provide the following information
    • Nature of the Emergency
    • Chemical Involved
    • Building
    • Room Number
  • If possible, remain on scene to meet response personnel and provide additional information
  • Alert others of the danger

CONTACTING AUTHORITIES:

  • Emergency Services — 911
  • Environmental Health
    • Gary Lee: 566-3063 or 320-3174
    • Monica Beevers: 566-3190 or 793-7874
  • Department of Public Safety — 566-3333 or 215-3091

MEDICAL EMERGENCY

IMMEDIATE ACTION:

  • If serious injury or illness occurs on campus, immediately call 911 and have someone else contact the Department of Public Safety at 566-3333
  • Have someone remain on the phone with 911 operators to provide updated information regarding the incident
  • In case of minor injury or illness, provide first aid care ONLY to the level of your ability
  • Be prepared to provide specific locations to the scene and request assistance from others present to standby to aid Emergency Services to get to the location upon their arrival
  • In case of serious injury or illness quickly perform the following steps:
    • Keep the victim still and comfortable. DO NOT MOVE THE VICTIM
    • Ask victim “Are you OK?” and “What is wrong?”
    • Check breathing and give artificial respiration if necessary and you are trained to do so
    • Control serious bleeding by providing direct pressure on the wound
    • Look for emergency medical ID’s such as bracelets on injured persons, question witnesses and give all information to the responding emergency personnel
    • Continue to assist the victim until help arrives

REMEMBER: Only trained personnel should provide first aid treatment

CONTACTING AUTHORITIES:

  • Emergency Services — 911
  • Department of Public Safety — 566-3333 or 215-3091

PANDEMIC FLU OUTBREAK

Flu refers to illnesses caused by a number of different influenza viruses. Flu can cause a range of symptoms and effects, from mild to lethal.

Most healthy people recover from the flu without problems, but certain people are at high risk for serious complications. A flu pandemic occurs when a new influenza A virus emerges for which there is little or no immunity in the human population; the virus causes serious illness and spreads easily from person-to-person worldwide. Two strains of flu, seasonal flu and the H1N1 (Swine) flu, are currently circulating in the United States. A third, highly lethal H5N1 (Bird) flu is being closely tracked overseas.

Extensive efforts are underway to track and monitor the spread of all flu viruses. In the U.S., epidemiologists at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) are working with states to collect, compile and analyze reports of flu outbreaks. Flu symptoms may include fever, coughing, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, headaches, body aches, chills and fatigue. In H1N1 flu infection, vomiting and diarrhea may also occur.

Annual outbreaks of the seasonal flu usually occur during the late fall through early spring. Most people have natural immunity, and a seasonal flu vaccine is available. In a typical year, approximately 5 to 20 percent of the population gets the seasonal flu and approximately 36,000 flu-related deaths are reported.

This year, the H1N1 flu virus may cause a more dangerous flu season with a lot more people getting sick, being hospitalized and dying than during a regular flu season. H1N1 is a new virus first seen in the United States. It is contagious and spreads from person to person. Like seasonal flu, illness in people with H1N1 can vary from mild to severe. For more information on the current flu pandemic or general information, please visit the CDC website: http://www.flu.gov.

Listed below are some general safety tips to help prevent the spread of flu viruses:

  • Practice good hand hygiene by washing your hands with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing. Alcohol-based hand cleaners also are effective.
  • Practice respiratory etiquette by covering your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your elbow or shoulder, not into your hands.  Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth; germs are spread this way.
  • Know the signs and symptoms of the flu. A fever is a temperature taken with a thermometer that is equal to or greater than 100 degrees Fahrenheit or 38 degrees Celsius. Look for possible signs of fever: if the person feels very warm, has a flushed appearance, or is sweating or shivering.
  • Stay home if you have the flu or flu-like illness for at least 24 hours after you no longer have a fever (100 degrees Fahrenheit or 38 degrees Celsius) or signs of a fever (have chills, feel very warm, have a flushed appearance, or are sweating). This should be determined without the use of fever-reducing medications (any medicine that contains ibuprofen or acetaminophen).  Don’t go to class or work.
  • Additional recommendations from the Center from Disease Control are:
    • Students ill with H1N1 should practice self-isolation (whether at their own home or the home of a friend/relative) and not return to campus until they have recovered.
    • Students who can utilize distance-learning methods may be able to continue studies even while ill.
    • Faculty, staff, and administration suffering from H1N1 should follow the same self-isolation guidelines as students.
  • Talk with your health care providers about whether you should be vaccinated for seasonal flu. Also, if you are at higher risk for flu complications from 2009 H1N1 flu, you should consider getting the H1N1 vaccine when it becomes available. People at higher risk for 2009 H1N1 flu complications include pregnant women and people with chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, heart disease, or diabetes). For more information about priority groups for vaccination, visit www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/acip.htm